11 Simple Tips for Successfully Playing Golf in the Rain

Men playing golf in the rain

Muster your courage as today we’ll be discussing something that many leisurely golfers actively try to avoid – playing golf in the rain. Whilst it’s true that many players initially see a drop in their performance, we’re here to tell you that it’s not all doom and gloom. As a matter of fact, there’s no reason why – with the right preparation and plenty of persistence – you can’t play well in wet weather. We’ve put together 11 tips to better arm you against inclement weather and give you the confidence to get out on the green come rain or shine.

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Not quite what we meant by golf “suit”…

Dress strategically with a waterproof golf suit

Waterproof clothing is everything when it comes to playing golf in the rain. Now, we get that a decent waterproof golf suit is by no means cheap – but bear with us. By saving up that little bit more and opting for higher quality pieces, you can be sure that your jacket, trousers, and hat will do a much better job at keeping you dry and will last a lifetime.

Your suit needs to be fully breathable so that you don’t feel stifled as you get into your game but should also be lightweight to avoid limiting your movements and impacting your swing. Choose a jacket that’s long enough to cover the torso when the arms are raised and trousers with zips at the bottom so that they can be rolled up when needed. A decent hat will help to keep the rain out of your eyes and protect your head from those heavier downpours. It will also help you to retain as much body heat as possible

A final bit of advice – avoid cotton tops. This kind of fabric will stick to your body as soon as it becomes damp, making for an unpleasant and constricting feeling as you move around the course. Instead, opt for a dry fit, athletic style top that’s looser on the body.

 

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While you’re at it, invest in some other waterproof gear too

There’s nothing worse for your morale when playing golf in the rain than walking around with water-logged shoes and socks. Be strategic by purchasing a pair of waterproof golf shoes and bring a change of socks to refresh your feet halfway through your session.

You’ll also want to look for shoes with plastic cleats – or metal ones if your club allows it – to help you get a better purchase on the soft ground and keep you stable as you swing. Once again, a decent pair of waterproof shoes will be that little bit more expensive but it’s definitely worth the investment.

A waterproof golf bag will help to prevent your clubs, scorecard, and other equipment from getting waterlogged as you move across the fairway. Many golf bags come with a protective hood, however, we recommend going a step further by picking up a waterproof cover for your bag. You’ll still need to have easy access to your gear, of course, but using a cover will help to protect the entirety of your bag, not just the top opening.

 

Golf towel
If you’re feeling fancy you can even get yours monogrammed

Bring along several towels to keep your gear clean and dry

It may seem like common sense but many players will only bring one towel when playing in wet weather. At some point that one lonely towel is going to get so wet through that it becomes redundant. You need to bring several towels with you and swap them around as each one becomes too wet to use any longer.

Always remember that your towels are not for keeping you dry – that’s why you wear waterproof gear. Your towels are there to help keep your equipment clean and dry, including your grips and your golf balls. Some players like to put their towels in plastic bags to keep them as moisture-free as possible before use.

 

Golf umbrella
These guys had the right idea back in the day

Get yourself a decent umbrella

We’re not just talking any old umbrella either; you want a golf umbrella, the double-layered kind that is extra sturdy and robust so that it doesn’t turn inside out from a particularly strong gust of wind. You’ll be thankful for that extra cover when those pesky showers are trying to soak you to the bone.

Some golfers have argued that using an umbrella is an inconvenience, which is where having a golf trolley comes in useful. Some trolleys – such as the Pro Rider 36 Hole Electric Golf Trolley – come with a brolly holder and this does all of the hard work for you. Not to worry if your trolley is missing this as you can always purchase a holder separately.

A handy trick that you may have seen other players doing on the green is to hang your towels and gloves on the inside of your umbrella. Not only does this keep them dry and aerated but it also means that they are conveniently close to hand when you need them.

 

Golfer taking a shot with one golf glove on

Swap out your normal gloves for rain gloves

As much as you love your usual gloves, they’ll no doubt prove your adversary when playing golf in the rain. Most leather and synthetic gloves become super slippery during wet weather, reducing your grip and causing all sorts of mayhem when attempting to make a shot. Rain gloves are a brilliant investment if you want more grip during those overcast sessions as they are specially designed to offer greater traction when wet.

If you are planning on using synthetic or leather gloves – we strongly suggest all-weather synthetic if you are deciding between the two – then remember to bring several pairs with you and take advantage of our handy umbrella tip about airing out your gloves between shots.

 

Winter wheels for Pro Rider electric golf trolley
A snazzy update for your leccy

Add winter wheels to your golf trolley

Using a golf trolley can be a big no-no for many clubs if there’s a downpour; this is because their flat wheels which cause soil compaction during inclement weather and this in turn results in water-logging, soil erosion, and general damage to the green.

Specially designed by Hedgehog for Pro Rider electric golf trolleys, our winter wheels use the latest design of parabolic studs to reduce contact with the fairway by over 75% and decrease weight resistance by 40%. Not only does this help to protect the green, it also makes your trolley easier to move and preserves more battery life.

Having to carry your bag around the green not only puts a strain on your body, it also adds an unnecessary distraction to an already difficult game. When it comes to playing golf in the rain either with or without your electric golf trolley, we know which one we would choose. Equip your Pro Rider electric golf trolley with winter wheels and save yourself unwanted hassle!

 

Golf clubs
You don’t want water trickling into those gaps

Keep your clubs covered up and your grips dry

Yes, we know it’s a bit of a pain but wiping down your shafts and grips is really important. Water or grit on your club face can cause the ball to slide and therefore decrease its spin. Cleaning your club or putter before and after each shot will ensure that you won’t get any unwanted moisture affecting your play.

You can use the hood on your golf bag to cover up your clubs between shots or, alternatively, place a clear plastic cover over your golf bag. Pat your hands dry after each shot to minimise the amount of water being transferred to your grips and place a towel at the bottom of your golf bag to absorb any moisture running down from your clubs – this will help to keep your club heads dry.

 

golf ball
Be the ball, be the ball, be the ball…

Get your head in the game

Dealing with the rain can be distracting, slow you down, and cause you to lose concentration. You’ve got to get focused and push through any irritation that the bad weather is provoking in you:

  • First things first, accept the weather for it is and don’t try and rush your shots to get out of the rain. It isn’t going to help your score if you are only concentrating on getting back to your car.
  • Secondly, try to follow through with your normal pre-shot routine and not get distracted by the weather. Golfers often lose sense of their normal tempo when the rain is coming down.
  • Thirdly, be patient. You are not going to perform as well as you would in more enjoyable weather, so try not to get frustrated and accept that, as with everything, you will improve with time and practice. Stay committed and play golf in the rain as much as possible so that you will get used to the conditions and improve your score.

You’re more likely to make bad decisions when you let your frustration get the better of you and this will see your score jump up.

 

Golfer practising his swing

Adjust your swings and shots

By now it will be very clear that the normal rules don’t apply when playing golf in the rain. Having good control over your shots is even more important when the ground is softer and the air is heavy with moisture. You’ll find that you actually sink down a little, so to avoid a fat shot and getter better control you’ll need to grip down by around ½ – 1 inch.

Your approach shots won’t fly as far in the rain or roll as far in the wet grass so take one club higher compared to normal. Be firm in your play and use your whole body, making a balanced and controlled swing to counteract potential slippage from the ground. To get better loft, opt for woods as opposed to irons; their low centre of gravity and the design of the head help you to cleanly lift the ball off of wet ground.

 

casual water on golf course

Know where you stand with ‘casual water’

Golf courses that aren’t well-drained often become waterlogged after a heavy rainfall and accumulate what’s known as “casual water”. Casual water is a temporary accumulation of water on the ground that is not a water hazard and is visible before or after a player takes their stance. If your ball ends up in casual water, you can take relief under Rule 25-1b, an abnormal ground rule condition. Lift your ball and drop it at the nearest point of relief, ensuring that you haven’t moved it closer the pin. The rules differ depending on whether you are through the green, in a bunker, on the putting green, or on the teeing ground. Full details of the rules can be found on the R&A website.

 

Golf ball

Set down your ball at the last second

The dimples in the surface of the ball quickly fill up with water, meaning that it will slide on contact with your club as well as sliding during the initial roll. Use a marker to line up and keep the ball aside for when you are ready to take your shot, giving it a quick wipe before placing back down on the ground. This will help to keep the ball as dry as possible and prevent any slips on impact.

 

golfers playing in the rain

Embrace the drizzle!

We’ll continue to dream of sunshine and blue skies but the fact of the matter is that our wonderfully unpredictable British weather will always throw some rainy days our way. As long as you stay prepared and head out onto the fairway with a positive attitude, there’s no reason why you can’t play well in wet weather. If you want to learn more about our winter wheels or see more of our fantastic golf product range, simply head on over to the Pro Rider Leisure website. We also have a friendly and knowledgeable team who are always on hand to offer support and assistance; if you have any questions please feel free to contact us by calling on 01604 813428 or emailing us at sales@proriderleisure.com.

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